Needham Family

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Residences - Shavington

 

Shavington

In 1438 John Needham, the great grandson of William de Nedeham who married Alice de Cranage and moved the family to Cheshire, took a lease from John Marston for ‘the manor of Shavington and lands in Shavington, Pylesdon, Hole,Wylaston, Mylneheth, Twemlowe, Aderley and Boterton' for 21 years at a rent of £12 13s 4d. John subsequently distinguished himself as a lawyer. In 1449 he became common Sergeant of the city of London and in 1450 was elected to represent that city in Parliament. He subsequently became a Judge. John so liked Shavington that on the expiry of his lease he purchased Shavington in 1461. He also purchased the remaining moiety of Cranage and the manor of Adderley.

The Needhams steadily expanded its area, buying further farms around it, but they seemed plagued with disputes over their tenancy and then their purchase.

They had a well known and longstanding battle with the Corbetts, owners of nearby Adderley Hall.

The last Needham to reside at Shavington was Francis Jack the second Earl of Kilmorey who resided at Shavington from 1831 to 1839. The Earl was an eccentric who had a passion for purchasing and selling lands and who built a wall said to be 7 miles long round the park. He left Shavington in 1839 and for nearly half a century the estate was deserted. Eventually he died and was succeeded by his grandson Francis Charles who shortly after his succession sold it to Arthur Pemberton Heywood Lonsdale. It has remained in his family since although the house was demolished in 1958, and only the stable block and laundry remain (ref 2)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In nearby St Peter's Church Adderley there are several plagues and memorials to the Kilmorey's including one that reads "Here lieth buryed under this stone the bodes of Sir Robart Nedeham knight and Dame Agnes his wife daughter of John Maynwaring of Pever ... which sayd Robart deceased the iiii daye of June Anno domim. 1556, and the sayd Agnes deceased the ii daye of maye Anno domim 1560"; the Kilmorey 'Pew' ( several pews clustered in a side chapel) 1635-1637  ; and a wonderful window (ref 2)

 

Source

 

1. History of Shavington, Henry D Harrod 1891; published by A Lack 2006

2. http://www.lackfamily.net/genealogy/residences/Nedham/needham_residences.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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