Needham Family

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Residences

 

 

Pool Park (ref 1)

Pool Park was brought to the Nedham family by Eleanor Bagenal, daughter of Sir Henry Bagenal and widow of Sir Robert Salisbury on her marriage to Thomas Nedham in 1601.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

It was for some considerable time one of the seats of the influential Salisbury's, one of whom William Salisbury, of Bachymbyd, stoutly defended Denbigh Castle during its siege by a portion of Cromwell's Army. Pool Park passed by marriage with the last heiress of the Salisbury's to Sir Walter Bagot, an ancestor of the present owner. Bachymbyd is a fine old Elizabethan Mansion , one wing of which was never completed, but is still extant and forms the Residence of Bachymbyd Farm. There are, on an eminence in front of the Mansion at Pool Park , two objects of great antiquity, the sepulchral stone of krnlvn, and a stone Chair. The monumental Pillar formerly stood on the summit of Bryn-y-Beddau (Hill of the Graves) set upon a large tumulus known as Bedd Emlvn (Emlyn's Grave) and it was removed for safe custody to Pool Park by Lord Bagot in 1813. There is a Latin inscription 'Airnilini Tovisaci' (Prince Emlyn) on one face, and an Ogam inscription to the same effect on two edges. The Stone Chair was also removed here for safety from Llys-y¬Frenhines (The Queen's Court) and it used to be called by the inhabitants Cadair y Frenhines” (The Queen's Chair). No trace of flints or tools of any kind can be seen on the chair; it bears a close resemblance to the coronation chair of the O'Neils of Castlereagh, near Belfast, and like the Coronation Chair at Westminster Abbey may well have served a similar purpose, the ancient custom being to seat a new chieftain in the chair on the summit of some high hill commanding a view of his Kingdom. There is on Pineyn Llys (a peak which is included in the sale), an interesting Pillar of Stonework pyramidal in form, commemorating the planting of vast areas of woodland by the second Lord Bagot. It is inscribed “As a memorial of his having completed the large range of Mountain Plantations which in part skirt the base of this Hill.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The house was sold about 1923 and eventually became a mental hospital. Its life changed somewhat during the Second World War, as it had a P.O.W. camp in the grounds. Finally, In 1995 it was sold by the N.H.S. to a builder, who presently owns it.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Source

1.http://www.lackfamily.net/genealogy/residences/Nedham/needham_residences.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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